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The Signs Of Poor Management

ManagersUnderstanding Poor Management 

Most of us understand the importance and business impact of good management.  Those who are at this level are the ones that other people turn to for guidance and to know which direction they need to move toward.  We also know that getting management right can be very difficult.  Although there is a lot of information out there on what makes a good leader or manager, and there are a lot of courses in existence on how to make things better, there seems to be a lack of information on what management should absolutely not look like, bar the absolute obvious.  Let’s take a look at some of the signs of poor management to help you identify whether there are any areas where urgent improvement is needed.

Lacking Listening Skills and Not Valuing People

Communication skills lie at the heart of good management—they are the key to virtually every aspect of business. It is by communicating effectively that managers can understand a person or situation, build trust, resolve workplace conflict, and help employees feel appreciated and valued.  This in turn leads to greater efficiency and increased productivity.  Listening is the foundation of effective communication–great managers are great listeners. Managers who are bad listeners are not capable of making others feel that their environment is a safe enough to express their feelings, ideas and opinions or to solve problems in a creative way.

“Too often a poor manager will not take the time to actively listen to their staff, instead choosing to check their e-mails, take phone calls and allow a variety of other interruptions whilst they are having a conversation/update/meeting with their people.”  10 Signs of Poor Management

Bullying

Unfortunately, bullying in the workplace is all too real.  We hope that this is something that was left behind in the school playground, or even that it doesn’t happen there either, but the reality is that bullies are not defined by their age.  Some managers can be terrible bullies.

“Public humiliation is an old, outdated habit of the classic authoritarian management style.  Unfortunately, it is still commonly used, as employees’ stories attest.”  Ten Things That Bad Managers Do

Because it is done by a manager, employees often feel unable to speak out against them.  They fear losing their job or that their lives will become more difficult.  Indeed, in many cases where employees have made a case for bullying, their silence has been bought, often to keep the statistics down.  Beating a bully can be very challenging and it takes a very strong and confident person to do so.  Unfortunately, those who have been bullied are often made to feel weak and lose most of their confidence.

A Lack of Focus on Personal Development 

A good manager should always be focused on the potential their employees have.  As such, they should be committed not just to their own personal and professional development, but also to that of their team members.  Supporting their personal growth is very important.  Sometimes, unfortunately, managers really miss the boat on this one.

“A lot of organizations aren’t doing the hard work to train their employees and expect them to come into the workforce with skills.”  10 Signs You’ve Got A Bad Boss

There are different reasons for this.  The worst managers don’t support their staff’s personal development because they simply do not care.  More often, however, it is because the budget simply isn’t available.  However, a good manager will then try to find funds, rather than passing the buck to those above them and saying their hands are tied.

In very rare cases, managers fail to support their staff’s professional development because they don’t want to lose a team member to a different, better position.  Although this is effect is complimenting the skills of that staff member, managers should always see themselves as examples, which means other people should aspire to be like them.  This means climbing the corporate ladder as well, even if that means a team may lose a really good member.

About 

Co-owner/Co-founder of Intesi! Resources. Educated as an architect I transitioned to technology during my career in architecture. Intesi! Resources was founded in 2002 and my focus is everything Web/eCommerce related from the design and development of our site to all the marketing activities involved. I also provide significant support for our clients on all our products and how they are used to deliver assessment-driven learning solutions that develop self-awareness and interpersonal skills.

This entry was posted in Management and tagged on by .

About Steve Giles

Co-owner/Co-founder of Intesi! Resources. Educated as an architect I transitioned to technology during my career in architecture. Intesi! Resources was founded in 2002 and my focus is everything Web/eCommerce related from the design and development of our site to all the marketing activities involved. I also provide significant support for our clients on all our products and how they are used to deliver assessment-driven learning solutions that develop self-awareness and interpersonal skills.

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